Summer Sanity: Serve

Can I get a show of hands? Who is ready for football and pumpkins and riding boots?

The strong craving for Fall hit me this week. I’d had my fill of summer and began to count the weeks for when the school year would begin. Not so I can ship my kids (my oldest is still only 3) off for the day, but just for the routine of the school year- and yes, of course for the reprieve of the triple digit heat that comes with Autumn.

By this point, most of us have done all of the typical summer stuff with the kids, right? Bubbles, pools, splash pads, popsicles, maybe even s’more roasting (although, we did ours inside). Even with all the running to and fro from summer activity to summer activity, some of us desire the routine of Fall because then there will be more people to be around. Our “regular” people. Not the strangers a few feet from you at the beach, but the people you do life with. Summer can be pretty isolating, especially if you have little ones who can’t be out in the heat for too long. So, at this point in the summer, if you haven’t done so already, it’s a good time to start shifting gears from “what am I going to do with MY kids this week,” to “what are WE going to do with (or for) others.”

Parents of older kids and parents who don’t live with easy access of amenities, I promised you ideas, and this post is where I want to park for a bit.

Like I’ve explained before, these posts are not meant to provide a checklist or even a how to list for your summer planning; they’re meant to be a springboard.

So, here we go… SERVING.

“REALLY, Lindsay? SERVING? Who am I going to serve? I’m already serving my family 24/7. How am I going to serve? Where?” Simmer down, sweetie. I promise, I’m not talking about you taking the kids out for an entire Saturday into a rough neighborhood to build a house. Just step onto the spring board with me; that’s probably not where you’re going to land…

Do you know a new mom? Does she have other kids in addition to her new baby? Serve her with your kids. All together y’all make her dinner and take it to her, or go pick up her child/ren and get them out of the house with you for a bit. Too complicated because you don’t have enough car seats for that? Ok, have her drop her kids off with you AND YOUR KIDS at your house.

Beforehand, tell your kids what you’re doing. “Kids, today we’re going to serve Ms. Stacy by watching her kids Alex and Annie while she takes Baby Andrew to the doctor.”

Don’t know any new moms? What about someone in the elderly population or maybe someone who’s fighting a long-term illness?

If you have older kids who can help with yard work, go over and offer to pull their weeds one morning. Tell your kids what you’re doing. “Kids, today we’re going to serve Mr. Sterling by helping him with some yard work.”

Don’t like those ideas?

Do you live somewhere where your older kids could set up a lemonade or baked goods stand? Have them pick something that has meaning TO THEM and put a sign up that says “100% of proceeds going to ___________.” And put a picture up of exactly who the money is going to. And have them MAKE whatever it is you’re selling. Shoot, if they like to make yarn bracelets, they could make and sell those too. Remember, SPRING BOARD!

Do you want to launch an adult out into the world who is solely self-focused? I mean, we live in a culture that is SELF-focused. I don’t know about you, but I want to be ahead of the messages my kids are going to get from the world. I want for serving others to be a natural discipline. So, every time we serve someone, in any way, I talk to my kids in simple statements like those above. Service does not have to be a huge endeavor. Often we hear the word “service,” and all it connotes is “sacrifice.” I mean, if you’re making dinner already, make double; there you go. For you, yes there’s a little extra time and some extra financial expense there (plus whatever is required for you to deliver that meal to someone), but the blessing that pours out on the new mom who needs that meal is immensely greater than whatever you sacrificed to give it to her.

There’s a Berenstein Bears book we love reading to the kids that lays this ground work very well. Maybe check this book out from your local library (or do like me and order it off Amazon Prime), read it to your kids, and when you’re done, ask them who they could be kind to and how. Take their hand and pull them up onto the springboard with you, bounce and see where you land.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Do you serve with your kids on a regular basis? I’d love to hear about it in the comments?

Bare Basics Beach Packing List

We just had the sweetest little family vacay on St. Simons Island. My in-laws rented a house within walking distance of the beach for themselves, our little crew, + my sis-in-love and her husband to stay in all together. SSI holds a special place in our family’s hearts, something I was very grateful to catch myself early in my relationship with David. This trip was extra special because it was the kids’ first visit to the island. 

Auntie E, Little Miss, Pops, J-Boy, Grammy B, & David

Last year we sort of “met in the middle” on Orange Beach, AL., and I completely over-packed! It was our first beach trip with kids, and we thought we needed it all plus some. This year, I said, “Less is best.” I just couldn’t bring myself to spend the fortune we had last year on a hundred things we didn’t need. Nor did I want to figure out how to pack it all again…

So, this is what this year’s Bare Basics Beach Packing List looked like… 

  • 4 beach towels
  • 2-3 swim suits per person (+ 2 cover ups for me)
  • 1 laundry ball + 1 tube of oxy-clean stain remover
  • 2 life-jacket-floaties (which we realized an hour into our drive that we had forgotten to pack, so we ordered them via Amazon Prime to be delivered to the beach house)
  • 4 bottles of sunscreen (various SPFs and formulas) + 1 bottle of after-sun care gel
  • 1 bike stroller-trailer (my in-laws already had our bikes, so they brought them for us)
  • 1 pair of clothes per person for each day we were there (4 full days + 2 half days)
  • 1 dress-up outfit per person for family pictures
  • 3 pairs of shoes per person (included at least one pair of water shoes)
  • 3 pairs of pajamas per person
  • 4 sippy cups
  • 1 noise maker
  • 1 iPad
  • 1 travel bed bumper
  • Basic toiletries + meds
  • 1 12-roll pack of toilet paper (for the beach house, because you never want to get to the VRBO and find yourself lacking toilet paper before the first grocery run!)
  • 2 beach bags
  • 2 chilly pads
  • 1 bag of toys (indoor toys like play-doh and color wonder and outdoor like bubbles and de-flated pool floats)
  • 1 cooler (with ice packs)
  • 1 booster seat for Little Miss (the house came with a high chair for J-boy)
  • 1 box of day diapers + ½ pack of nighttime diapers + 1 pack of swim diapers
  • 3 packs of diaper wipes
  • 1 baby monitor
  • 1 extension cord

And that is basically it! (We did have a few other things that were packed just for the car ride, like snacks, hand sanitizer, and books for the kids.)

We knew we weren’t going to camp out on the beach for hours, so we intentionally didn’t bring our beach tent or beach chairs or even beach toys. (I did wish we’d brought a beach umbrella, however. Thankfully, our in-laws had one that J-boy retreated to.)Our kids are just too little- they can’t hang that long in the heat whether there’s an umbrella or not. Since the beach is so close to our house, they’ve been getting their beach fix early in the morning before lunch and then again after dinner. All the time in between has been spent at the house either in the pool or napping. 

For years I packed with a mission-trip mentality…

 “If I am going to be spending the night in the middle of the jungle, I’ll want to be sure I’ve packed xyz because there’s not going to be anywhere to buy it!

This has come in handy many times, I will say, and it was also really good for when we were traveling with infants. You really do just need a lot of stuff when you’re traveling with babies that you don’t want to have to buy when you get there purely because of how expensive baby stuff is.

This bike stroller-trailer was an investment and 100% worth it!

I am grateful to be able to shift my mindset into more of a minimalist packing approach now that our kids are getting a little older. Or maybe I’m mellowing? Who knows! But either way, I hope this list helps those of you who are preparing for a beach trip this summer with littles too. 

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Summer Sanity: Invest in a Membership

If you’re just now joining us, this is the 2nd post in my Summer Sanity Series. Last week I encouraged you to explore the idea of getting your kids into the habit of helping out with household chores. For those of you with older kids (and teens), stay tuned, a post with specific chores targeted for that age group is coming.

The topic of today’s post has full potential to majorly stress some of you out since memberships = MONEY. But, in our experience, we’ve found that purchasing the right memberships save us money AND save our sanity.

I see you crinkling your brow not sure about where this is going… hang with me.

What is the “right” membership? Let’s start by answering that question first.

The right membership is to a place.

STOP!!

That’s important… to a PLACE. A PLACE being a physical establishment of some kind that is not in your home. You leave your house to get to it. I am not referring to a subscription e.g. Netflix, Hulu, YouTube TV, all kinds of the “boxes” that can be delivered to your home. That’s not what I’m talking about.

What I’m talking about is when you pay money, either annually or monthly, and it gets you unlimited access to a PLACE that you GO to.

Examples: zoos, aquariums, museums (bonus if it’s cool museum that curates with children in mind), indoor playgrounds, gyms that offer awesome childcare (yes, that counts!), the neighborhood aquatic center, etc.

Our zoo has a farm section. Here A & J are practicing their milking skills!

As I am writing this we have three such memberships… Our local zoo, an indoor sensory playground, and our neighborhood pool. The zoo is an annual membership, the playground is for 6 months, and the pool is just for the summer.

What this means for me is that during the day, no matter what the weather is like, I have a place I can go that I know my kids enjoy. I know where the bathrooms are. I know what the rules are. Basically, I already have my bearings there. And it’s already paid for! All I have to do is load the kids in the car and go there.

It takes loads of stress of me AND my husband. He has so much peace knowing I’m taking the kids places by myself that are safe. Because 99% of the time, I am going to these places by myself.

Our Kids Club offers fun family events throughout the year! This was a cookie party we got to take my parents to with us one weekend when they came to visit. Little Miss had a blast!

Picking the right membership for your family is going to be based on your family’s needs. My kids are too young for our town’s children’s museum, but in a few years, they may prefer it to the zoo.

Not going to lie, our neighborhood pool is THE BEST.

When choosing the right membership you should also consider cost and accessibility. Are you really going to make it there enough times to get your money’s worth? Are you going to leave feeling spent, in all the bad ways, or are you going to leave feeling empowered, like you just had a successful outing with your kids?

We’ve yet to regret purchasing the three memberships we currently have. I use one of them at least once a week, and honestly, during the summer, it’s been more like 2-3x a week. For us, each has been a worthwhile investment, not so much for the kids’ entertainment, but for my mental load. Plus, it’s GOOD for me to get out of the house. I need places where I can go with them that are positive outings for all three of us.

Do a little research and see what’s accessible and affordable for you. Live somewhere in the middle of nowhere without any of the above mentioned places within a reasonable distance? Stay tuned. I’ve got more ideas coming your way.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Summer Sanity: Kids and “Chores”

Welcome to the first post in my Summer Sanity Series. My hope is that these posts help you get out of ruts with your kids this summer. I know sometimes all I need is an idea, not necessarily a plan, to work with. What works for one family, or what even worked for the families my husband and I grew up in, isn’t going to necessarily work for mine, but that doesn’t mean the whole idea has to be dismissed. So, take my ideas in this series as just that, ideas.

Question: What is the one thing most kids have during the summer that they don’t have during the school year? Answer: More time on their hands. Many a parent is faced with the question, “How do I fill all this time????” Hence, the reason for this series, and I have startling news… We don’t have to fill all the time with outings and activities and vacations and playdates. Summer is a great opportunity to take advantage of that extra time by instilling some good habits into our kids. Cue, chores.

Now I’ve heard many, many a parent say, “Let kids be kids!” That’s cute, and has merit, when it comes to imagining they’re riding a flying unicorn across the ocean wearing a tutu and a superhero mask, but that doesn’t mean all they should do is play. Play is important, do not misread this. But so is responsibility. I believe if you want to launch responsible adults into society one day, you need to first raise responsible kids. Chores are a fantastic way to get started.

“But, Lindz, my kid is literally two years old. Aren’t chores extreme at this point?”

A chore chart with stickers is definitely a bit much for a two year old. And chores should always be developmentally appropriate.

So, let’s get practical. What can a toddler do? And how should you frame it?

Again, you’re going to need to determine what’s appropriate for YOUR kid, but mine have started helping out around the house with these chores at age 2…

  1. Picking up toys and putting them away (invest in bins, chests, and baskets for toys that your kid can easily access).
  2. Putting their dirty clothes into the laundry hamper.
  3. Cleaning up small spills with a towel or picking up food that’s thrown during meal/snack time.
  4. Walking around with a hand vacuum to help vacuum while you use the big vacuum.
  5. Putting sorted laundry away, like towels. (We have a drawer for washcloths in the kids’ bathroom that they can easily reach, and we have a drawer for kitchen towels in our kitchen. It’s accessible so even our two year old can get a towel whenever he needs one, AND he can put clean towels away when it’s laundry sorting time.)
  6. Bringing you used cups / plates / bowls from the table when meals are over. (I also have my kids carry their sippy cups and shoes out of the car when we get home.)
  7. Pushing the start button on the washer / dryer / and dishwasher. (Side note to parents of older kids… If your child can operate a smartphone, they can operate a dishwasher. If your child is tall enough to load/unload the washing machine, your child is old enough to be doing their own laundry.)

My three year old does these chores in addition to what the two year old does…

  1. Unloading safe items from the dishwasher. (She doesn’t unload anything that has to be put into an upper cabinet, is very heavy like my glass mixing bowl, or is sharp, like a vegetable peeler.)
  2. Sorting socks.
  3. Putting her laundry away. (We have all of her clothes, aside from dresses and jackets which are hung, in drawers that she can open and close on her own. So, she usually puts all of those clothes away by herself when we’re folding laundry.)
  4. Wiping the table down after meals. (My three year old LOVES this job. She loves using my H2O at Home chiffonettes to clean, so this is play for her.)
  5. Drying pots / pans with a dish towel.

We also don’t call any of the above listed activities “chores.” It’s just stuff we do and helping out with it is just being a part of the family team. Everyone pitches in.

My husband does a great job of leading by example on this “team approach” as well, so when dinner is over, EVERYONE clears the table together. When it’s time to pick up toys before bath time, EVERYONE picks up toys. We also frequently call ourselves a team. In fact, we’re TEAM WARFORD. And we give each other high fives when we finish something together.

Summer is a great time to get your kids in the habit of helping out around the house. Make it fun. Turn on music and sing together while you sort and put away clothes (there was music playing when Little Miss was picking up those playing card in the above picture, hence the silly, happy face). If your kids are older, they may really enjoy a chore chart and incentives for completing it. (Suggestion: No video games today until you finish your chores.) You may want to include daily chores and weekly chores depending on how old they are. Or shoot, you may even have one big summer chore or project that you want completed before they go back to school, like tackling a closet or the garage or painting something. ; )

Remember what I said at the beginning of this post, take these ideas as IDEAS. This is your little spring board. Spring off of it and do what works for you and your family. But, when it comes to “chores” and helping out around the house, let me leave you with this…

Do not deprive your children of the opportunity to contribute to your family by helping out around the house. The sense of accomplishment and responsibility that comes with tackling simple, and not so simple, chores positively develops your child’s self-esteem. Begin empowering them as soon as you can. Why not start this summer?

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Travel Diaries: San Antonio Re-cap

Pardon the water spots on the mirror.

Hey friends! So, summer showed up! (insert laughing emoji) This dress was my momiform last summer, and I wasn’t disappointed at all when I found it while pulling out all of our summer clothes last week before we took a long weekend trip to San Antonio.

We had the sweetest time there visiting with our family and celebrating my great-grandmother who turned 100 this past Sunday.

We decided to try a couple new things this trip; one being we stayed at a VRBO instead of hotel. My parents generously rented a house for them, our little crew, and my two siblings to stay in (so 6 adults total + 2 toddlers) just around the corner from my grandparents’ (where all of the festivities would be). David and I are completely sold on using VRBO or Air BNB for long weekends going forward- no more hotels. Having a fenced in back yard to stick the kids in was such a blessing (for all affected parties) after our 9 hour car ride. Plus we didn’t have to worry about kids waking up at all hours of the night or coming back to the hotel for naps right when house keeping was in the middle of changing bed sheets.

We also explored the San Antonio Aquarium, which was something none of us had ever done before. It was a great little spot for toddlers since they have so many hands-on exhibits. I would highly recommend it IF you have an hour that you need to fill, and you don’t really want to be outside. I was able to get a Groupon for our tickets, which significantly reduced the price, so check them out before you buy tickets, and don’t plan on spending a whole day there (it only takes 1-2 hours to experience everything) or go on a Friday like we did (aka field trip day aka lots of little crowds).

The kids have talked about the exhibits with the birds and alpacas since we got home as well as a fiesty little tortoise who almost crawled out of his exhibit.

But what’s been really special is all the talking they’ve done about their cousins and family members who they got to spend time with while we were at my great-grandma’s birthday party. My brother (pictured above) mentioned how special, and rare, it was to have a day where everyone (except for two family members who were down with a stomach bug) could come together and genuinely enjoy each others company for an entire day. Not to mention how rare it is to celebrate someone becoming 100 years old!

On our drive home, I kept thinking about his comment. The truth is family gatherings with toddlers are a little overwhelming for us right now. We enjoy seeing family and being with them, but we’re never able to 100% focus on a conversation or even stay the whole time. We usually have to skip out for a bit for naps and most places aren’t 100% toddler proof. (Am I the only one who is terrified someone is going to give my two year old a grape while I’m not looking?) And you’re going to have toddler meltdowns at some point on a trip, so odds are one could very well go down right smack dab in the middle of the family gathering.

So, I wanted to encourage the other mamas (and dads) who know the feeling. I know you’re out there, because many of my friends fall into our boat too. “Is it really even worth it?” is a question I hear posed a lot when it comes to bringing toddlers to social gatherings.

We’re super privileged to have family who GETS IT. Aunts and uncles and cousins who help, grandparents who say when we have to leave early, “It’s ok! Go. Take care of your family.” But that still doesn’t remove all the overwhelmingness that manages to creep in before and during the gathering.

My dad encouraged me a couple months ago to tackle social gatherings (and trips in general) with a man-to-man offensive strategy. I take one kid; David takes another. Sometimes, we have to switch, and sometimes we have to tag another family member to cover for us for a minute. But, we’re still on the same team with the same goal. We usually remind each other what the goal is too before we walk into the gathering. (e.g. We’re here to celebrate Mammaw.) It helps me stay focused and not get so overwhelmed, AND it helps limit directing our frustrations towards each other.

We’re not perfect parents. We don’t have this parenting thing down pat, but this strategy (along with respectful communication) did help a lot at my great-grandma’s birthday party, and we plan to use it from now on while we’re in this stage of life with littles who need so much of our attention.

Some social situations aren’t going to be conducive with toddlers. They’re just not, and it’s 100% ok to skip out. But other things, like great-grandma’s 100th birthday party, are non-negotiable. We’re going to be there no matter what, and I’m grateful for a new tool in the toolbox to limit my anxiety while we’re there. That way, when it’s over, my kids aren’t the only one with fond memories of the occasion.

Do you have a strategy you implement in large social gatherings with your little kids? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay


Easter Preparations

My kids recently started attending a Mother’s Day Out program TOGETHER, which means for the first time since becoming a mother I have a three hour window each week (that is not a nap/nighttime sleep window) where I can _________ (fill in the blank). Today I find myself at a local coffee shop enjoying this… BY MYSELF.

Iced Thai Latte + Carrot Cake

I love my kids, and I am incredibly grateful that I get to be at home with them. Do not get me wrong. But I’m also grateful for this quiet time when I can focus completely on work / continuing education hours / an adult conversation with a friend / etc.

Focusing, these days, requires some major intentionality on my part.

With Easter around the corner and my 3-year old now old enough to understand more about our Savior and the day He defeated death, I wanted to prepare for Easter intentionally. I wanted to get ready for Easter in the same way that we prepare for Christmas: with decorations and festivities and clothing and story reading and movie watching. But even more so, I wanted to prepare our hearts for the day, not just prepare a bunch of themed activities.

So, the first step I took was deleting all of the social media apps on my phone on Ash Wednesday. With the massive distraction that social media can bring removed, my chances for intentionality got a lot better.

Next we decorated our Easter tree.

I love how the colors of the eggs pop on the tree before the buds start blooming!

Then we hung our eggs in the kitchen.

Sparkle Easter eggs from the light fixture in our eat-in are my kids’ favorite decoration- probably because we spend so much time each day around our kitchen table.

We pulled out all of the Easter books (a couple we keep out all year, but the rest go into a box with the Easter decorations).

We’ve decorated Easter-themed sugar cookies (which came out of a kit from Walmart).

We’ve been watching everything we have about Moses and the Exodus. This includes The Price of Egypt (available on Netflix) and the Superbook episode Let My People Go (available for free on Prime Video).

And, David and I are preparing to celebrate a Christian Seder meal with our kids on Passover. (This year it is the day before Easter). My family began to celebrate Passover in this way when I was a teenager. In so doing, I began to understand the continuity of the Gospel throughout the Bible in a way I never had before. I purchased this book on Amazon, and we will use it as a loose script for our Christian Seder.*

I’ll be honest. Some of this has been kind of hard for me. We’re not shy in saying that we’re very protective of the content our children are exposed to. When my 3-yr old looked at a picture of Jesus on the cross in one of her Easter books and asked me what the red stuff on his hands was, I paused, but then I answered her.

I’m a hands on learner, so it’s natural for me to give my children activities to help them understand something. Things like baking croissants with marshmallows in them and dying Easter eggs… I learn best when my hands are working. My children both appear to be auditory learners, which is why we’ll still be intentional in talking and listening while we engage in our Easter festivities.

Preparing for anything these days is a lot work, but preparing for Easter has been such a joy this year. Nothing has been elaborate. Everything has been on our children’s developmental levels.

Our hope and prayer is that when Easter Sunday comes, our children awake not just to filled Easter baskets (which yes, we will do), but with excitement and an understanding that today is the day we CELEBRATE that Jesus is alive. We pray that seeds are planted in tangible ways for them to understand His sacrifice and why it was necessary and so incredibly perfect.

Wherever you are in your preparations for Easter, whether for your family or just for yourself, I encourage you to be intentional too.

Do you have an Easter preparation activity that you do every year? Or that you plan to do this year? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

*I am not endorsing this book by sharing it here on the blog. I am merely sharing it as a resource since that’s how David and I are utilizing it- as a resource. We grew up in a church that recognized the Christian Seder. My family celebrated it, as I mentioned above. But, we needed a resource to reference for prepared and sharing this special meal on our own. We chose this one because it focuses on presenting the Christian Seder to a child.

Status: Off Social Media

Hey there friends. Long time no see! I promised you I’d post here since I’m off social media for lent. So, again, hey there!

Frequently asked questions on the subject (being off of social media):

  1. Lindsay, I didn’t know you were Catholic. Or, are you? – Nope. Not Catholic. I’m a non-denominational Christ-follower. But there have been many years when I’ve chosen to give up something up for these several weeks to help prepare my heart for Easter by reminding me of either sacrifice or in this year’s case reminding me of the greatest connection / relationship of all time.
  2. Will you stay off of social media forever now? You say you’re really enjoying it, but I miss your posts! – I’m praying about it, because yes, these few weeks of being “disconnected” have been a very positive experience. And to be completely honest, I think I’d really like for God to tell me “YES, close every social media account you have.” But He hasn’t yet. If He does, I will.
  3. I don’t know if I could make it without social media. I mean, it’s my connection to everything. You’re a work-from-home mom; you don’t feel that way? – Yes, in many ways I do. I was very surprised at how isolated I felt in the first couple weeks. Especially during stretches when I was “trapped” at home with a sick kiddo. But, it was in these moments that I remembered two things: 1. there are other ways to connect with people other than social media (even when you’re trapped at home with a sick toddler), 2. I have an ever-present companion with me, the Holy Spirit, and a Maker who desires quality time with me.

A couple things I’ve really enjoyed about being off social media:

  1. I don’t feel the need to keep up with the Jones’. Or to explain myself. Or to be vulnerable at all times.
  2. My kids only see me on my phone when it’s work related, or I can’t remember the words to an old Shirley Temple song and must consult Google.
  3. I’m more productive. We as a family are more productive. David and I even built a brick paver patio off of our back deck last weekend.

A couple things I’ve missed:

  1. I don’t take near as many pictures now. I used to take pictures just for Stories all the time. Now that I’m not thinking about posting to Stories, I’m not taking as many pictures.
  2. Current events. The other day I had what I can only describe as a craving for current news. I ashamedly only know what’s going on in the world if David tells me about it or it is mentioned on my instagram feed. I even stopped and looked at the front page of a newspaper in Walmart the other day (the headline was of relevant interest to me). I couldn’t remember the last time I touched a newspaper.
  3. Connecting with my friends from afar who I pretty much only connect with these days through Instagram. Is it sad that that’s how we communicate? Not at all. Because of Instagram I get to correspond with people I knew when I was a KID who I would probably never have reconnected with without social media. I love that I get to see what they’re up to and that they get to see what I’m up to. I LOVE IT. I also love the encouragement that happens, especially between my other mamas-with-littles friends. You know that saying, “It takes a village,” well boy does it. But in more ways than just helping carrying diaper bags and kids and sharing diaper wipes and germ-x and just caring for children. We mamas (and dads) need STRONG, wise counsel and encouragement. We need to know other people feel the same thoughts we do. (And you know I could take a long tangent about mental health right here, but I’ll keep it brief. If that mama is also dealing with any kind of anxiety or depression [postpartum or not], this is even more important, and I literally believe breaking the bondage that isolation brings saves lives.) As my mom always says on the topic of social media, especially when I’m ready to switch to a flip-phone and leave the entire social media space forever, “don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.”

I have a few upcoming posts in mind that I will be publishing within the next couple weeks. I’ll be sharing…

  • Some ways we’re intentionally using this time to prepare for Easter (and Passover)
  • My new recipe for a Matcha Latte (including an iced version)
  • A re-cap/reflexion post of our upcoming trip to Texas.

So, stay tuned. And I’d love to know if you’re also off social media for lent (or any other reason) and what your biggest take-away from the experience has been.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay