Easter Preparations

My kids recently started attending a Mother’s Day Out program TOGETHER, which means for the first time since becoming a mother I have a three hour window each week (that is not a nap/nighttime sleep window) where I can _________ (fill in the blank). Today I find myself at a local coffee shop enjoying this… BY MYSELF.

Iced Thai Latte + Carrot Cake

I love my kids, and I am incredibly grateful that I get to be at home with them. Do not get me wrong. But I’m also grateful for this quiet time when I can focus completely on work / continuing education hours / an adult conversation with a friend / etc.

Focusing, these days, requires some major intentionality on my part.

With Easter around the corner and my 3-year old now old enough to understand more about our Savior and the day He defeated death, I wanted to prepare for Easter intentionally. I wanted to get ready for Easter in the same way that we prepare for Christmas: with decorations and festivities and clothing and story reading and movie watching. But even more so, I wanted to prepare our hearts for the day, not just prepare a bunch of themed activities.

So, the first step I took was deleting all of the social media apps on my phone on Ash Wednesday. With the massive distraction that social media can bring removed, my chances for intentionality got a lot better.

Next we decorated our Easter tree.

I love how the colors of the eggs pop on the tree before the buds start blooming!

Then we hung our eggs in the kitchen.

Sparkle Easter eggs from the light fixture in our eat-in are my kids’ favorite decoration- probably because we spend so much time each day around our kitchen table.

We pulled out all of the Easter books (a couple we keep out all year, but the rest go into a box with the Easter decorations).

We’ve decorated Easter-themed sugar cookies (which came out of a kit from Walmart).

We’ve been watching everything we have about Moses and the Exodus. This includes The Price of Egypt (available on Netflix) and the Superbook episode Let My People Go (available for free on Prime Video).

And, David and I are preparing to celebrate a Christian Seder meal with our kids on Passover. (This year it is the day before Easter). My family began to celebrate Passover in this way when I was a teenager. In so doing, I began to understand the continuity of the Gospel throughout the Bible in a way I never had before. I purchased this book on Amazon, and we will use it as a loose script for our Christian Seder.*

I’ll be honest. Some of this has been kind of hard for me. We’re not shy in saying that we’re very protective of the content our children are exposed to. When my 3-yr old looked at a picture of Jesus on the cross in one of her Easter books and asked me what the red stuff on his hands was, I paused, but then I answered her.

I’m a hands on learner, so it’s natural for me to give my children activities to help them understand something. Things like baking croissants with marshmallows in them and dying Easter eggs… I learn best when my hands are working. My children both appear to be auditory learners, which is why we’ll still be intentional in talking and listening while we engage in our Easter festivities.

Preparing for anything these days is a lot work, but preparing for Easter has been such a joy this year. Nothing has been elaborate. Everything has been on our children’s developmental levels.

Our hope and prayer is that when Easter Sunday comes, our children awake not just to filled Easter baskets (which yes, we will do), but with excitement and an understanding that today is the day we CELEBRATE that Jesus is alive. We pray that seeds are planted in tangible ways for them to understand His sacrifice and why it was necessary and so incredibly perfect.

Wherever you are in your preparations for Easter, whether for your family or just for yourself, I encourage you to be intentional too.

Do you have an Easter preparation activity that you do every year? Or that you plan to do this year? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

*I am not endorsing this book by sharing it here on the blog. I am merely sharing it as a resource since that’s how David and I are utilizing it- as a resource. We grew up in a church that recognized the Christian Seder. My family celebrated it, as I mentioned above. But, we needed a resource to reference for prepared and sharing this special meal on our own. We chose this one because it focuses on presenting the Christian Seder to a child.

Status: Off Social Media

Hey there friends. Long time no see! I promised you I’d post here since I’m off social media for lent. So, again, hey there!

Frequently asked questions on the subject (being off of social media):

  1. Lindsay, I didn’t know you were Catholic. Or, are you? – Nope. Not Catholic. I’m a non-denominational Christ-follower. But there have been many years when I’ve chosen to give up something up for these several weeks to help prepare my heart for Easter by reminding me of either sacrifice or in this year’s case reminding me of the greatest connection / relationship of all time.
  2. Will you stay off of social media forever now? You say you’re really enjoying it, but I miss your posts! – I’m praying about it, because yes, these few weeks of being “disconnected” have been a very positive experience. And to be completely honest, I think I’d really like for God to tell me “YES, close every social media account you have.” But He hasn’t yet. If He does, I will.
  3. I don’t know if I could make it without social media. I mean, it’s my connection to everything. You’re a work-from-home mom; you don’t feel that way? – Yes, in many ways I do. I was very surprised at how isolated I felt in the first couple weeks. Especially during stretches when I was “trapped” at home with a sick kiddo. But, it was in these moments that I remembered two things: 1. there are other ways to connect with people other than social media (even when you’re trapped at home with a sick toddler), 2. I have an ever-present companion with me, the Holy Spirit, and a Maker who desires quality time with me.

A couple things I’ve really enjoyed about being off social media:

  1. I don’t feel the need to keep up with the Jones’. Or to explain myself. Or to be vulnerable at all times.
  2. My kids only see me on my phone when it’s work related, or I can’t remember the words to an old Shirley Temple song and must consult Google.
  3. I’m more productive. We as a family are more productive. David and I even built a brick paver patio off of our back deck last weekend.

A couple things I’ve missed:

  1. I don’t take near as many pictures now. I used to take pictures just for Stories all the time. Now that I’m not thinking about posting to Stories, I’m not taking as many pictures.
  2. Current events. The other day I had what I can only describe as a craving for current news. I ashamedly only know what’s going on in the world if David tells me about it or it is mentioned on my instagram feed. I even stopped and looked at the front page of a newspaper in Walmart the other day (the headline was of relevant interest to me). I couldn’t remember the last time I touched a newspaper.
  3. Connecting with my friends from afar who I pretty much only connect with these days through Instagram. Is it sad that that’s how we communicate? Not at all. Because of Instagram I get to correspond with people I knew when I was a KID who I would probably never have reconnected with without social media. I love that I get to see what they’re up to and that they get to see what I’m up to. I LOVE IT. I also love the encouragement that happens, especially between my other mamas-with-littles friends. You know that saying, “It takes a village,” well boy does it. But in more ways than just helping carrying diaper bags and kids and sharing diaper wipes and germ-x and just caring for children. We mamas (and dads) need STRONG, wise counsel and encouragement. We need to know other people feel the same thoughts we do. (And you know I could take a long tangent about mental health right here, but I’ll keep it brief. If that mama is also dealing with any kind of anxiety or depression [postpartum or not], this is even more important, and I literally believe breaking the bondage that isolation brings saves lives.) As my mom always says on the topic of social media, especially when I’m ready to switch to a flip-phone and leave the entire social media space forever, “don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.”

I have a few upcoming posts in mind that I will be publishing within the next couple weeks. I’ll be sharing…

  • Some ways we’re intentionally using this time to prepare for Easter (and Passover)
  • My new recipe for a Matcha Latte (including an iced version)
  • A re-cap/reflexion post of our upcoming trip to Texas.

So, stay tuned. And I’d love to know if you’re also off social media for lent (or any other reason) and what your biggest take-away from the experience has been.

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Mary in a Stable

Am I the only one who gets weepy when thinking about Mary giving birth in a stable? It’s a recent thing that’s happened to me in the last several years. I’m sure it has everything to do with having experienced two pregnancies / labors / vaginal deliveries- each that went completely different from the other.

Every time I look at a nativity during Christmastime I can’t help but think about what that was like. I have this weird “gift” that allows me to “be somewhere else.” I’m sure there’s a word for it. The one that comes to mind is “guided imagery.” I think about the dust, the straw, the noises the animals were making, the noises of the city, Bethlehem, a buzz with travelers there to be counted for the census. I think about the lack of everything… I mean, she wasn’t even in her stable where she’d have a least known where they kept the buckets or the rags or whatever you kept in a stable in those days. It was a stranger’s stable- in a town not her own. She didn’t have a midwife. And while the Bible doesn’t say it, I don’t think I’m too out of place in assuming that Joseph did not have ANY experience in delivering babies. And I highly doubt he had any clue what a placenta was.

Yet in the midst of all of it, He was born. She had cloths to wrap him in and a feeding trough to lay Him in, but that’s it. While some of us may have welcomed family and close family members into our delivery rooms after we birthed our babies, she welcomed strangers- unannounced shepherds.

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We look at our nativities and see a fully dressed Mary with a head covering kneeling over her baby boy. But, let’s face it, right after you deliver a baby, the average woman waddles. You bleed. And if your milk comes in on day one, you’re experiencing fire flowing through your milk ducts as they open.

I think about all of these things now when I look at Mary in a stable. The reality of what happened that night in just that one piece of the story.

She gave birth in a stable. She recovered in a stable. She received guests in a stable. She learned how to nurse her baby in a stable.

I had my husband and my mom and nurses and doctors tending to me and then lactation consultants and chaplains and you name it the next day coming in to complete their checklists.

She had sheep and donkeys and goats and whatever else… and a baby. A very important baby. The most important baby.

God chose to bring that baby into the world in a stable: a place of filth (we’re talking animal waste filth y’all) and a place of isolation (no one else was bunking up in there).

When I get to Heaven one day, I would love to hear Mary share “Jesus’s birth story”- you know, in the same way we share our children’s birth stories with our girlfriends. The reality of delivering a baby in a stable shakes me, and what’s more is it was God’s plan.

He chose for His Son to be born in that place. Jesus, the one who created the universe, was going to be a helpless newborn sleeping in straw mere feet away from animal poop. If that isn’t a demonstration of humility, I don’t know what is.

The Christmas Story from beginning to end is full of incredible details, but in this season of life that I find myself in, raising little ones, the actual birth of Christ and the image of a postpartum Mary in a stable, overwhelms me.

What a way for God to bring His Son into the world that He Himself created. What love. What a Christmas.

❤ Lindsay

Kids Christmas Activities, part 3

So we were struck with illness the last couple weeks, and never have I ever been so grateful to be able to do so many festive activities at home with things that we, mostly, already had, which are the features of today’s blog post.

Activity #1 – DIY Pipe Cleaner Ornaments!

My favorite thing about this little project is you can make it as simple or extravagant as you want. Add beads, glitter, sparkly pom-poms, ribbon- whatever floats your boat. Or, just use pipe cleaners like we did. My 2nd favorite thing about this project- the ornaments you end up with are non-breakable! (Cue round of applause!)

One of the kids’ favorite books is “Orange Bear Apple Bear,” so we made one of each for our tree. The kids were completely tickled, and it reminded me of making balloon animals- just with a whole lot less energy expenditure. 

Basically, all you need are pipe cleaners, and, again, any extra embellishments you’d like to add! 

Activity #2 – Christmas Cookies (Baking and Decorating)

Batch #1!

We’ve now made two batches of Christmas cookies because this activity is that much fun. Most likely, you already have everything in your pantry / fridge to make homemade sugar cookies. I like this recipe from Real Simple, but I’ll bet your Southern Living or Joy of Cooking cookbook has one in it too. If you don’t want to make them from scratch, you could always grab a box mix or even do break and bake if you prefer. Although, if you’ve been following me on Insta for any amount of time, you know I love getting my kids involved in food prep. So, the fact that this activity is a two-part activity (baking AND decorating) is a win-win. 

Besides what you need to make the actual cookies, you will need things to decorate with. We used Lenox cookie cutters that one of my grandmas gave us last year, pre-made cookie icing, and red and green sugar sprinkles. I also had a couple things of red and black gel icing in our pantry that we used too. 

Don’t want to be sweeping all of the sprinkles off the floor? Have your kiddos work inside of jelly roll pans and your sprinkles have a better shot at staying more contained on top of the table rather than multiplying all over the floor.

Don’t have cookie cutters and don’t want to buy them? Use cups or circular Tupperware to make round ball ornaments out of! Or, roll your dough into a rope and curve it at the top to make it a candy cane. Cookie cutters are just an extra- not an essential.

The most important thing to remember when baking / decorating Christmas cookies is to keep it fun. It’s going to be messy, the cookies are not going to look like something you’d buy at a bakery, you are going to end up with some broken cookies I’m sure (we did both times), and at some point your toddler will figure out those sprinkles (and dough) are edible and will cease to decorate but commence eating instead. Try to roll with it as best you can and enjoy the giggles. 

I hope this gives you a little inspiration this week for how to spend quality time with your kids AND get into the holiday spirit a bit all within the comforts of your home. This series will wrap up shortly with part 4 coming soon!

Until then,

❤ Lindsay

Kids’ Christmas Activities, part 2

Hey friends! So, if you missed part 1, I shared a little bit about how we approach home church and a couple of the things we did this past Sunday with our kids, as we found ourselves at home Sunday morning unable to attend church. I left you with us heading to the kitchen for our “family activity.” 

This is not a new craft, I know. Surely people have been making these little homemade wreaths for decades. And my guess is that’s because they are so easy to make, you can literally use whatever you have at home, and it works for almost all ages and skillsets (we even assembled these at our church’s ladies’ Christmas event last year)

The supplies I gathered were…

  • red and green card stock (but, you can any kind and color of paper, including Christmas wrapping paper)
  • a pair of scissors (I have 1 pair that makes the decorative cuts, so I used those, but regular scissors are perfect)
  • a cardboard box (the handiest I had was a pull-ups box)
  • glue (I grabbed a glue stick and liquid glue, but you could use double sided tape, staples, or even rubber cement if you wanted)
  • tape
  • some red ribbon (all I had on hand was your standard shiny red ribbon for wrapping presents in, but again, you can use any kind of ribbon at all, or you can even go sans ribbon!)

The night before I cut leaves out of the card stock by folding the pieces of paper in half and cutting half ovals/hearts out of them. 

The next morning I used a box cutter to cut circles out of the cardboard box. I flipped a glass cereal bowl on top of the broken down box and traced it with a sharpie, then I cut along that line. (Don’t worry about making a perfect circle though- you’re going to be pasting leaves on top, so no one is going to see the cardboard.) When I had popped out my circle, I cut another circle out around that circle to make my ring/wreath. 

Now comes the assembly part- aka, where the kids come in- unless you have older kids, in which case, they may be able to cut the leaves out themselves. You know your kids and how well they handle a pair of scissors, so I’ll leave that call to you.   

Show your kids how to use the glue to stick their leaves onto their wreath, and let them go to town! Help them as needed, but try to let them do as much of it as they can, within their abilities of course. That’s what makes it fun! 

You may find you need more leaves. Don’t panic! Cut out some more, and if you don’t have any more of the paper you originally used, that’s ok, grab a different color and let them color a design on that paper in the original leaf colors before you cut the leaves out. So, in the case of our wreaths, I’d grab white paper and red and green crayons or markers. 

We found the glue adheres a lot better to the side of the pull-ups box that isn’t shiny, and you’ll get a fuller-effect from your leaves if you affix them with the leaf opening up toward you inside of towards the cardboard.

When you’re done, have your kid tell you which part of the wreath is the top, and then flip it over. There at the top, affix your ribbon with tape or a stapler, and wa la, homemade wreath! 

Our whole family had a ball with this little project, and their wreaths look adorable hanging up in our dining nook. They have loved looking at them and point to them with big grins on their faces. I plan on doing this every year with our kids and am excited about all of the potential this little project has. It can be THIS SIMPLE, or it can a lot more elaborate depending on the kind of paper and ribbon you choose to use. Make it your own and make it work for your family and the developmental stage your kids are in. 

Stay tuned for more of the Christmas activities we’re doing with our kids this month, and be sure to tag us on Insta or comment below if you give any of these ideas a whirl with your family. We’d love to hear about it!

Until next time,

❤ Lindsay

Kids Christmas Activities, part 1

I grew up in a family that attended church every Sunday morning. Not only did we attend, but we were involved in church. My parents were always serving in some capacity, and we (us three kids) began serving as well as soon as we were old enough. Once in a blue moon, however, we missed church on Sunday. And when those Sundays happened, we had home church. I can remember my dad sitting down with all of us in one of our family rooms with his big black Bible open, and he’d read scripture to us, we’d talk about it, and sometimes we’d even have music. He’d play something on the boom box for us to listen to or sing along with. He set a very important example for us in this way… Sometimes, for whatever reason, you won’t be able to get to go to church, but that doesn’t mean you can’t set a special time aside on Sunday to honor the day by studying God’s word, worshiping Him, and talking about God’s work and word with believers around you.

David and I have been in this season of not getting to go to church most Sundays for the last three years pretty much. Our daughter has a slightly weaker immune system than most kids, so she catches almost any germ that blows by her, and it takes her body a little longer to fight that germ off, which translates to she’s sick a lot. Anatomically, she’s also susceptible to moderately severe secondary upper respiratory infections, so we have to be really careful with how we manage even a simple cold. So, long story short, we end up missing church a lot. 

(Before you start sending me every oil or supplement we could try with her to help her immune system, trust me, we’ve tried most of them, and gratefully we’ve found a regimen that is beginning to make a huge difference for her.)

But, just like how my dad modeled for us, we haven’t let not being able to attend church stop us from setting time aside on Sunday to honor the day as a family. Home church has looked different for us over the last few years as we’ve being raising two children in stages from infancy to three-nager, but currently it looks like this most of the time: Bible lesson, discussion, family activity. (David and I are able to supplement with Bible study together and independently, podcasts, and online church sermons. The kids and I are also able to attend a Bible study during the week when everyone is healthy.)

During the month of December, you can guess what we’ll be spending most of our Sundays focusing on- Christmas! It’s easy to share the story of Jesus’ birth with little kids, but activities may be a little harder to pull together. So, this week I’ll be sharing some that we’re doing. The best part is, most of these activities cost NOTHING- you can use things you already have around your home, or you can order them online, which means no having to hunt for stuff with the general public during the most wonderful time of the year. 

Our daughter came down with bronchitis over Thanksgiving, so today was another home church Sunday, and we pulled out one of our absolute favorite family Christmas traditions and made the beginning of our home church lesson. 

For those of you who, for whatever reason, don’t want to go the elf on a shelf route, DaySpring has the sweetest alternative- The Shepherd on the Search. Every day the shepherd moves around the house on his search for baby Jesus, and every morning your kids wake up and search for the shepherd. Christmas morning, when they wake up, the shepherd will have found Him, and he’ll either be sitting in the nativity you set up in your home or in the nativity box that he comes inside of

The set includes a sweet book too that is an excellent conversation starter for young children about the day Jesus was born. 

I loved watching both our daughter’s excitement last year as she’d scurry around the house looking for him and the smile on my husband’s face as he watched her (as he is the one who has taken ownership of moving our shepherd, Sammy, each evening before we go to sleep). I’m excited that our son will be old enough this year to join in on this fun tradition too. 

After we read the book, and re-named our shepherd (because none of us could remember what we named him last year!), we watched The Star together as a family. Oh my goodness, my husband and I haven’t laughed that much at a movie in a long time! We absolutely loved it, and again, it provided excellent opportunities for us to talk about the circumstances surrounding Jesus’ birth during and after watching the movie. I can guarantee we’ll be watching it a couple more times before Christmas gets here. (Also, I have to say, I was super impressed with all of the accurate Biblical references in the movie, so big-thank-you-hug to everyone who played a part in making that so, and to Sony for leaving it that way.)

After we watched The Star, we moved into the kitchen for our NO-COST family activity, which I’ll share with y’all later this week! 

Until then,

❤ Lindsay

P.S. This post does contain affiliate links, but my opinions are always my own. Thank you for clicking through!

Kristina: An Empath’s Guide to Surviving the Holidays

Yes… We are here again. The Holidays… (said in my best Eeyore voice) With Christmas quickly approaching, so is the anxiety for your friendly neighborhood empath. What is this ’empath’ you speak of? Well friend, let me break it down for you before we dive in to my own personal survival techniques.

Most of the time, people consider empaths to have this unnatural, almost paranormal, “sixth sense” that allows them to sense and physically feel the emotions around them. For me, this category also includes your introverts, quiet folk, peacekeepers, shy ones, and the Meyers-Briggs INFJs, so this is really for anyone who falls under those labels. We simply have more empathy in our souls than most, and that makes us painfully aware of our surroundings. In other words, you will not find us throwing elbows at your local big box store for a cheap television on Black Friday. I shudder at the thought.

So, that sounds pretty harsh, right? The one time of year when emotions are running at their highest, a little family drama is inevitable, and we are destined to feel every single eye-roll at the depths of our soul. Never fear, my friends. We will survive, and here’s a few tips to keep your tinsel from getting tangled.

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1. Avoid guilt-tripping yourself.

Let’s just start off with a big one… Say it with me friends, “I cannot please everyone!” I am from a family with several divorces and remarriages. I have never seen this as a hinderance, but more of, “I just have more people to love me!” And it’s true, but the problem is that I had to teach myself that it is not possible to attend every single family gathering. It is not your fault that time travel hasn’t been invented yet…probably. Do your best to focus on the gathering you have chosen. There’s no use in feeling guilty the entire time you’re at one party because you will likely subconsciously distance yourself from the people you chose to be with. That’s no fun for anyone!

2. Book, but don’t overbook.

Going along with the last tip, you really do need to schedule your holidays to avoid the anxiety that goes along with being pulled from all directions. Decide. Make it known. Stick to it! If you volunteer to bring or make something, plan ahead of time and choose something simple. My husband and I planned the menu for our Thanksgiving dinner a week ahead of time. We ordered our groceries via Walmart Grocery Pick-up* and had them loaded into our car by an employee the Sunday before. It was truly a life saver!

3. Master the art of smalltalk.

Total cringe. Being an empath has made me so incredibly aware of things like awkwardness, mistakes, embarrassment, silence, tension… Trust me. If it’s uncomfortable, I’ll feel it. You really have two options when it comes to smalltalk when you’re not good at it and your BFF isn’t available. One, stick to the most extroverted people in the room. While the conversation can be a little overwhelming, you won’t have to do much talking. Just listen and be present. Now, if for some reason the extroverted people are engaged in a conversation or activity you don’t want to be a part of and you’re stuck with awkward, quiet cousin Bob, remember that there’s a good chance he feels the same way you do. Instead of focusing on how YOU feel, try making it your goal to make Bob feel more comfortable. Ask questions. People love to talk about their hobbies. Find out what they are and become genuinely interested in learning more. Even if something might not sound cool to you, it might mean the world to cousin Bob and this is the quickest way to give people the opportunity to open up. If cousin Bob’s quietness isn’t wavering, it’s ok embrace it in silence. Somehow our society has decided that silence is awkward. Personally, I am a firm believer that can be beautiful too. It all depends on your perception!

4. Don’t be afraid to step away for a moment.

I am the QUEEN of sneaking off for a moment at holiday gatherings. My head will often become a jumbled mess, and I can’t even speak if I don’t take a breather from a crowd. I have learned over the years that this is totally fine because it’s what my mental health requires. While the family is playing a crazy party game that sounds like pure torture to your quiet soul, go grab a slice of Mema’s semi-famous coconut creme pie, bundle up if it’s cold, and head to the porch for a few moments. Take a walk. Lock yourself in the bathroom if you have to (guilty), but one way or another, give yourself a few moments of peace. Your brain will thank you later.

5. Do something for YOU!

If you don’t take away anything else from this post, please consider this most… People will tell you the holidays are about family right? While I do agree, I also believe that the holidays are also about love, appreciation, and peace. You deserve all of these things, even if it’s coming from yourself. For real… Treat yourself! Have a favorite menu item that you decided not to make because you’re afraid no one else likes it? So what?! Make it anyway. You might be surprised at who might like it, and remember that even if it is a bust with your friends and family, you get to take home all the leftovers! Feel as though you have nothing to wear? Find a new-to-you outfit. Even if you don’t feel like you have the money to purchase something brand new, check out your local thrift stores for a deal, or ask a friend if you can borrow something fun! Still dreading gathering because you know you’ll be drained afterwards? Set aside some time to do an activity you love that very same day, even it means you need to leave a little early.

Friends, if you’ve paid attention, you’ve probably noticed that there’s really one common trait amongst all my tips. Focus on controlling your thoughts and actions instead of focusing on how you feel. Emotions are a wonderful thing, but sometimes they can get the best of us. Especially for those of us who not only feel our own feelings, but the feelings of others as well. The holidays are absolutely the most emotional time of the year, and our environment can truly be overwhelming. I hope that I was able to give you a few tips to help you survive the chaos, but if not, please don’t be afraid to open up to a friend about your concerns. Remember, you deserve love, appreciation, and peace, and I hope you are able to not only survive, but thrive this holiday season!

xoxo, 

Kristina

*Note: This post is not sponsored but by clicking “Walmart Grocery Pick-Up” in the text above, my friends and family can save $10 on their first pick-up order of $50 or more (pre-tax)! Walmart does all the in-store shopping. It’s so easy! You place your order online, pull up to a specially marked parking spot after scheduling a time for pick-up, and an associate will load the groceries your vehicle! How awesome is that?!